Start a conversation with someone you don’t know

Friday, 9 August, 2019

40% of Brummies say they often feel alone, and 37 % of Brummies over 65 will be living alone by next year, increasing their risk of isolation. These proportions are higher than the England and regional figures.

The Make Someone’s Day campaign aims to help tackle loneliness and isolation across Erdington, and encourage people of all ages to connect with people around them. Starting conversations with people and making those conversations a habit can lead to friendship and acts of kindness. It could be checking in with a neighbour, asking someone how their day has been while waiting on the bus, or talking about the weather with someone in the park.

There are lots of ways to take part: come to the launch at Erdington High Street from noon onwards on the 14 August, host a banner, help spread the word, and most importantly; start your own conversations.

Nina, 67 from Tyburn, who has experienced social isolation and helped develop the campaign, said, “Without connections, you get stuck in a rut, and out of the habit of meeting people.

“Everyone has a story and something to say. If I’m taking the bus, I try and chat with people at the bus stop as I know it can really make my day, and someone else’s too!”

Find out more about the campaign by visiting https://www.ageingbetterinbirmingham.co.uk/makesomeonesday

The Make Someone’s Day campaign is run by Ageing Better in Birmingham, a programme working to reduce isolation for people aged 50 and over in the city. It is funded by the National Lottery Community Fund and delivered by a partnership led by Birmingham Voluntary Service Council (BVSC).

Ageing Better in Birmingham is part of Ageing Better, a programme set up by The National Lottery Community Fund, the largest funder of community activity in the UK. Ageing Better aims to develop creative ways for people aged over 50 to be actively involved in their local communities, helping to combat social isolation and loneliness. It is one of five major programmes set up by The National Lottery Community Fund to test and learn from new approaches to designing services which aim to make people’s lives healthier and happier.